Black Tide

2018-11-06T07:51:47Z (GMT) by Cat Hope
For trumpet and electronics.

For Callum G'Froerer
Featuring prepared Biwa by Mitsuaki Matsumoto

Premiered at the 'Phenomena' program, Totally Huge New Music Festival, October 28, 2017, Perth Town Hall.
Also: 'The Relighting of the Sun' program, November 2, 2017 Abbotsford Convent, Melbourne, Australiia
Unerhörte Musik, Berlin. February 27, 2018.
​Die Skulptierte Trompete: PROGR Bern (Aula) (Waisenhausplatz 30 3011 Bern)

This work is part of a series of works for instrument and sub tones, but expands the idea of the subtone by adding additional concrete sounds. It reflects on the impact of the earthquake and subsequent tidal wave in Japan that occurred on the composer’s birthday in 2011. On a trip to Tokyo soon after the event, there was a lot of talk about water: radioactive water and a poisoned sea. As an island, lakes suddenly become more precious. This piece takes inspiration from water – depth, texture, reflection and the tension of it’s surface. The notation is this piece is derived from maps of Lake Biwa in Japan, and he electronics part features a Biwa, a traditional Japanese instrument, modified, prepared and amplified (performed by Mitsuaki Matsumoto) in addition to subtones.

Performance Notes
Each colour represents a different bell of the trumpet.
Green is the added bell, red is the original bell. All notes are subtones – except when the line is opaque, which represents breath only. A solid line is a single, unwavering sub tone. Orange means breathe in. The dynamic is never above medium soft.
Fine line under the colour indicates a mute, as marked.
Crosses mean tap superball stick on the bell, dots are tongue rams.
The electronics part is indicated in opaque pink, and plays through the ScorePlayer. This should be routed left channel to sub woofer, right channel to a single, normal range speaker. The part is provided as a erough guide for the performer only. There is a long tail of audio at the end, which should slowly fade out to end the piece.

To perform this work, need to download the iPad app, the Decibel ScorePlayer which has many more features for performance. You can download the file for the player here. It has the audio part embedded in it, you will need to run mini jack out of the iPad into a sub woofer directly. You can also play the score from the video file, available from the composer. A digital or hard copy of the score is available from Material Press.

The work was also discussed in a paper by Dan O'Connor and Lindsay Vickery as part of the 2018 TENOR conference, available here.