Going global: a cross-cultural study of the willingness of new hires to accept expatriate assignments

2017-06-05T06:47:37Z (GMT) by Cianni, Mary Tharenou, Phyllis
Human resource managers struggle with attracting potential expatriates as well as enhancing the success rate of those who do accept expatriate assignments. The trend toward increased numbers of expatriates is expected to continue. More recently, companies are requiring more junior-level employees to accept international moves. This present study examines the experiential and psychological factors related to new hires' propensity to accept international assignments. Psychological variables included international orientation, career insight, attachment to family and friends, outcome expectancies, extraversión, and selfefTicacy. The experiential variables included prior international experiences and prior number of domestic moves. The study employed samples from both an Australia (n = 89) and a United States (n = 86) university. The hypotheses were tested by hierarchical multiple regression to test if the situational variable of attachment to family and friends remained related to receptivity for international work after the individual variables were taken into account. The model explained 69% of the variance with international orientation being the most highly related variable. The country of origin was the next most important and then outcome expectancies and self-efficacy. International experience was also relevant but less so and willingness to relocate domestically was very weakly related. The results have implications for human resource policies related to selection, training and reward systems related to expatriate assignments. The limitations of the present study are examined and future research needs are discussed.

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