The Post Truth Pleasure Garden

2019-09-03T22:33:00Z (GMT) by Cat Hope
For large ensemble and electronics (bass Flute, Bass clarinet, violin, viola, percussion, 2 voices, guitar and bass).
Written for Ensemble SuperMusique, Montreal, Canada.

“More than 30 years ago, academics started to discredit “truth” as one of the “grand narratives” which clever people could no longer bring themselves to believe in. Instead of “the truth”, which was to be rejected as naïve and/or repressive, a new intellectual orthodoxy permitted only “truths” – always plural, frequently personalised, inevitably relativised. All claims on truth are relative to the particular person making them; there is no position outside our own particulars from which to establish universal truth” (Andrew Calcutt, 2016.)

Using this statement as a starting point, The Post Truth Pleasure Garden explores the concept of ‘truths’ through the sampling and reversioning of two acoustic instruments in the ensemble. The grand narrative is destroyed, a new orthodoxy created and everything you hear is relative to the people listening.
The words sung state “Australia now ignores laws of basic #HumanRights” This is a quote from former president of the Australian Human Rights Commission, Gillian Triggs, at an oration in 2017. She notes that “the idea of alternative facts which had credibility has created an ‘Alice in Wonderland’ world where words mean what we choose them to.”

Performance Notes:
Voice 1(pink): dotted line indicates a.m. radio tuned to static. Lines are simple tones without vibrato Voice 2(purple): dotted line indicate a.m. radio tuned to static. Lines are simple tones without vibrato. Bass Flute (red), dashed line flutter toungue. Bass clarinet (green), dashed line, deep gurgling sound. Violin (blue), dashed line extra bow pressure. Viola (orange), dashed line extra bow pressure. Guitar (blue), dashed line is distorted sound. Bass (deep purple), dashed line is distorted sound. Percussion (yellow): four cymbals, and one snare. Cymbals bowed and stuck. One sizzle (indicated with dshed line) Electronics (opaque colour of instrument chosen to sample). Develop your own program or contact for the composer.
The score should be read in the Decibel ScorePlayer application on an iPad, or as a video score, available on the composers’ website. Software to facilitate the electronics is available from the composer, or can be made by the performers.